The Dawson Law Firm, PC index
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Disclaimer:
The content of this web site is not intended to be legal advice, nor does it create an attorney-client relationship with any visitor. Nothing herein should be construed to be a warranty of any result, which is prohibited by the NC State Bar Rules of Professional Conduct.
KENNETH CLAYTON DAWSON















Member of:

North Carolina State Bar, Admitted August 1982
Federal District Court, Western District of NC
Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, Admitted
North Carolina Bar Association
North Carolina Advocates for Justice
Judicial District 17-B Bar Association

Scholastic Background:
Wake Forest School of Law, Class of 1982
A.J. Fletcher Scholar
Bluefield State College, Valedictorian Class of 1979
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities, 1979
Alphi Chi Honor Society

Kenneth "Clay" Dawson has argued cases in Courts across the State. He has also appeared before the Industrial Commission, as well as Federal Trial, Appellate  and Administrative Courts.

Mr. Dawson has authored two books: Out of Order, a novel, and Personal Safety, a nonfiction work. He also wrote an article, Death and Your ATV, which has been used in Marshall University's off-road vehicle course. He graduated first in his class from Bluefield State College in 1979 and had the honor of giving the Valedictory Address before the Commencement Speech of Senator Robert Byrd, then the United States Senate Majority Leader. Mr. Dawson graduated from Wake Forest School of Law in 1982 with a Jurisdoctorate Degree as an A.J. Fletcher Scholar. He has been active in various organizations, including the NRA-ILA in which he served as an Election Volunteer Coordinator for three Congressional Districts. Mr. Dawson’s creed is, “You have rights!” He will fight for them. 

THE DAWSON LAW FIRM, PC
534 East King Street * King, N.C. 27021
1-888-433-1169
336-983-3192

Fax 1-888-448-3901
Fax 336-983-3923

help@thedawsonlawfirm.com
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The Dawson Law Firm, PC
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534 East King Street * King, N.C. 27021
Phone 336-983-3192 * Fax 336-983-3923
Toll Free Phone 1-888-433-1169  *  Fax 1-888-448-3901
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APPELLATE CASES WON  BY THE DAWSON LAW FIRM

Myers v. Baldwin, ___ N.C. App. ___, 698 S.E.2d 108 (N.C.App. 2010)

This was the latest appeal pursued by The Dawson Law Firm. It involved the question of who can sue for custody of minor children. In this case, a baby-sitter obtained an ex parte Order for custody of a two year old boy who was not related to her. The Firm litigated the case in Courts across three counties. Ultimately, the Court of Appeals ruled unanimously in our client's favor and set aside the babysitter's custody orders.

Montgomery vs. Montgomery, 136 N.C. App. 435 , 524 S.E.2d 360 (2000)

The Montgomery case overturned statutes which required parents to submit to visitation by their children's grandparents. Mr. Dawson successfully argued to the Honorable William B. Reingold, Chief District Court Judge for Forsyth County that the statutes were unconstitutional. The Court of Appeals affirmed the decision by a unanimous 3-0 opinion. The ruling has been cited in numerous cases since.

In re Estate of Montgomery, 137 N.C.App. 564, 528 S.E.2d 618 (N.C.App. 2000).

In this appeal, Mr. Dawson successfully fought off five different actions to disqualify his client from Administering her late husband's estate. The challenging parties never advanced any of their cases beyond the pleading level. Each one was dismissed as a matter of law. Mr. Dawson later settled a Wrongful Death action for the Administratrix against a major corporation for 1.6 million dollars.

Matter of Ingram, 74 N.C.App. 579, 328 S.E.2d 588 (1985)

This Opinion is 25 years old, but it is still cited the "North Carolina Civil Commitment Manual" used by courts personel. At the time of the decision, Mr. Dawson had been practicing only three years. He successfully argued to the Court of Appeals that a petition for involuntary commitment proceedings must be sworn.


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